Element Gold (Revised)

Element Gold (Revised)

Element Gold (Revised)

Gold has been called the most beautiful of all chemical elements. Its beauty has made it desirable for use in jewelry, coins, and artwork for thousands of years. It was one of the first pure metals to be used by humans.

Gold is one of the few elements that can affect politics and economics. Wars have been fought over access to gold. Cities and towns have sprung up and died out as gold was discovered and then mined out. Many nations still count their wealth according to the amount of gold they keep in storage.

Gold lies in the middle of the periodic table. The periodic table is a chart that shows how elements are related to one another. Gold is a heavy metal in a group known as the transition metals. Gold is also known as a precious metal (as are palladium, platinum and silver).

 

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Gold Reserve Act of 1934

Gold Reserve Act of 1934

Gold Reserve Act of 1934

The gold standard is a monetary standard that ties a unit of currency, or money, to a stated amount of gold. Under this system, both banks and the government stand ready to redeem their note and deposit liabilities in gold at the stipulated rate. In September 1931 the United Kingdom abandoned the gold standard, and many countries followed. The United States held on to the gold standard until 1933, when both foreign and domestic demand for gold led to runs on U.S. banks (with depositors and note-holders rushing to cash in their assets for gold). The fear was that a large number of banks would fail due to insufficient gold to cover demand, and that the U.S. official gold stock would be depleted. This economic danger occurred just as President Herbert Hoover’s term was ending and Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s had not yet begun. Moreover, there was no cooperation between the president and president-elect. Rumors were spreading that the new president might terminate U.S. adherence to the gold standard.

 

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history Of Precious Metals

History of Precious Metals

History Of Precious Metals

The valuable, relatively rare, and highly corrosion resistant metals, which are found in the periodic table in the vertical groups VIIIB and IB and the horizontal periods 5 and 6, are called the precious metals. They include (with atomic numbers) ruthenium (44), rhodium (45), palladium (46), silver (47), osmium (76), iridium (77), platinum (78), and gold (79). The platinum group metals include (along with platinum): ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, and iridium. The three most popular precious metals are gold, silver, and platinum. They have historically been valued for their beauty and rarity, and are commonly referred to as the precious metals. Platinum usually costs slightly more than gold, and both metals are about 80 times more costly than silver. Precious metal weights are given in Troy ounces (named for Troyes, France, known for its fairs during the Middle Ages) a unit approximately 10% larger than 1 oz (28.35 g).

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Gold rush

Gold Rush

Gold Rush

Sutter’s Mill. On 24 January 1848 the American James Marshall discovered gold at John Sutter’s mill in northern California. This strike set off one of the most dramatic economic events of the nineteenth century. When word got out concerning the gold’s location, people soon began scurrying into the hills seeking even more of the precious yellow metal—and many found it, at least at first. Word of the placer (or surface) gold spread throughout the world. In 1849 alone, about eighty thousand people came to California; by 1854 three hundred thousand had arrived. Vast amounts of gold came out of California. Historians have estimated that miners extracted $10 million of gold in 1849, $41 million more of gold the following year, and another $81 million of gold in 1852. The amount declined thereafter, but miners still mined $45 million of gold from California in 1857.

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